Raised beds · Vegetable growing

Harvesting carrots

So carrots this year for us were very much a ‘let’s just chuck some seeds in this empty space and see what happens’ kind of thing. I had some free seeds from a magazine and a bit of a gap from where some of our beetroot seeds hadn’t taken so C and I just threw some in to see what happened. When C is sowing seeds they tend to be rather unevenly sown, try explaining ‘sow thinly’ to a toddler! I wasn’t really expecting any of them to come to much, it was more a bit of fun for C. We have since sown a few carrots into a pot by the side of the house, and a last few into the raised bed. It’s been quite exciting watching the tops emerge and thrive but of course you don’t really get an idea of what the soil is hiding. 


One of the biggest pest risks to carrots is carrot fly. They are attracted to the scent of the carrots apparently (I never really smell carrots but apparently they have a scent which attracts the bugs). So it’s best to try and avoid disturbing the soil until you are pulling them up. When I was pulling them up though I was surprised that there really was a carrot smell. As they were so closely sown (and as I did no thinning whatsoever) there are some very interestingly shaped ones where they haven’t had enough space to really grow, but I still am very proud. I think we’ll just give them a clean and then cook them whole, unpeeled or maybe try them raw with some hummus. 




I think it will be a few more weeks until we can start harvesting our next batch but I think I would definitely plant a few more carrots next year. I don’t think we would ever manage to grow enough to be self sufficient in them (we do go through a lot) but we could certainly have a few little tasters during the year. Not bad for a packet of free seeds really (Grow your own magazine, Autumn King 2 variety for anyone who’s interested) and we still have plenty of seeds left for next year. 

Raised beds

Filling a gap

So with harvesting the turnips we now have half a raised bed empty, the other half still has beetroot in. I had thought about planting some more carrots but J suggested that I kill two birds with one stone and transplant some of the cauliflowers that I needed to thin into the space. We will always use cauliflowers and they have the advantage of not needing to be picked straight away (you can cover the head over with the leaves and keep them in the ground for a while) so it seemed like a sensible decision. So this morning C and I dug some holes in our empty space, only about 7 along the row.


Then we watered the ground well and pulled up a few cauliflower plants from our existing over crowded bed and planted them soil all into their new homes.


I then gave them another quick water. C and I were then out for the rest of the day and I didn’t get to revisit the raised beds until gone 7:30pm. This was the sight which I found.


Not a good look. There has been a big heatwave in the UK this week so I’m guessing (hoping) they just need more water as they settle into their new home. Worst case scenario and they don’t take I can always pull them and plant some seeds before it gets too late. The heatwave is supposed to be ending tomorrow so maybe they’ll fair better then. Fingers crossed.

Raised beds

Thinning seedlings

Yesterday I did my first thinning of the turnip seedlings. When I planted the seeds I did so rather thickly thinking that with my success rate of growing then I would be lucky to get any to sprout. However as luck would have it we have had a good number sprout and now they need to be thinned. Thinning just involves picking out seedlings to give the required gap between plants. C was very helpful in pulling out seedlings although needed some guidance about actually leaving some to grow. I will probably need to thin some more but it’s enough for a start to give the little turnips more room to grow. As an added bonus the thinned seedlings make a great treat for the chickens. The photo shows one row thinned and they other still to do.

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